The Falsified Definition of a ‘PR Girl’

This article is an opinion piece in response to the PR Week article The New Face of ‘PR Girls’.

The stigma the media gives to ‘PR Girls’ completely overlooks the vast majority of female PR professionals and aspiring professionals in today’s corporate world.

I can admit that while trying to figure out what I wanted to major in at the collegiate level, I chose to major in public relations because I wanted to live the glamorous life of Samantha Jones. Let’s face it, what 17-year-old girl wouldn’t want to live in New York City and live the glamorous life she had?

However, after I entered Boston University, I quickly learned that the media has painted a falsified picture of working as a successful public relations woman. While there are many women who work and live like Samantha Jones, the majority of female PR professionals are not uppity and materialistic–they are incredibly passionate about what they do.

PR Week recently came out with an article titled The New Face of ‘PR Girls’, that touches upon the fact that the portrayal of  ‘PR Girls’ is far from accurate. Author Audrianna Giulani said “the ‘PR girls’ that rule today are more likely to worship hashtags than shoes.” Giulani very accurately points out that, ‘PR girls’ of today thrive off of tweeting about the latest and greatest thing.

The ‘PR Girl’ I now respect is a woman who has made herself into a brand. She tweets about things she is passionate about and is up-to-date with the majority of PR and social media trends.  I feel that the stigma placed upon ‘PR Girls’ undermines the talents that we have. The phrase ‘ PR girl’ devalues the hard work that women in the public relations field do. PR women are those who work hard to produce the best best results they possibly can–not ‘PR girls’.

Although I have yet to enter the work force, I know that the falsified image of ‘PR girls’ that is depicted in media is not who I am. As I continue to further my endeavors in public relations I look forward to making a brand out of my name, which is in my mind much more important than living the glamorous “Samantha Jones”-lifestyle.

Do you believe that there is a false stereotype of a typical PR girl?

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Posted on December 7, 2011, in Other and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Comments Off on The Falsified Definition of a ‘PR Girl’.

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